Land for Sale off Sandy Lane

If you live on Sandy Lane or that area or walk along the Ridge, you’ll be interested in this: https://www.auctionestates.co.uk/property/363-11-5-Acres-Of-Strategic-Land-Sandy-Lane-Bramcote-Nottingham-Ng9-3gs If the link is not working try http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-65425144.html

20 Comments

  1. This isn’t good news. As far as I can ascertain the land falls within the jurisdiction of both Nottingham City and Broxtowe. And if it is sold for development then more than 50% of the eastern Bramcote Ridge will be lost. Say good-bye to wildlife corridors. Yet alone joined-up thinking between local authorities and Neighbourhood Forums.

  2. If correct Richard is quite right. I have asked for clarification from the Head of Broxtowe Borough Council Planning.

  3. Green belt land. But after the loss of part of Deddington Plantation, this area must not be built upon.
    It would seem that the price indicates that the land has no value for development. But as it is so cheap, how about arranging a community purchase?
    It is not the responsibility of the council to use our council tax payments to acquire the land. But we could arrange a community fund to preserve the area.

    1. Howard – it isn’t in the greenbelt and therefore does not enjoy that level of ‘protection’ which is given by national planning policy.

  4. Auctioneer’s site says it was sold for £200,000

  5. Who was it sold to? Are they going to tackle The Japanese Knot Weed that supposingly exists on that site.

    1. If speculator has bought this land how can we defend it against development/ continue to defend the green corridor. Surprised that this appears to be little known about so far

      There certainly is Japanese knotweed there – in only one location so far, gradually swamping more and more bluebells (and everything else) each spring and summer

      1. Hi. The site has protection on both the Borough and City side through a SINC (Site of Importance for Nature Conservation). I have also spoken to Broxtowe planners who have advised me that permitted development’s chances are next to zero.

      2. Are you sure it’s Japanese Knotweed Fiona. The reason I ask is your reference to its gradual increase as I understand that you can almost see JK growing, if not visually certainly on a daily basis.

  6. Who owns the land now? How close to zero is ‘next’ for ‘Broxtowe planners’? How can we make sure that the site remains safe? And how can the new owners be compelled to tackle the Japanese knotweed?

  7. As you say Steve the new owners need to know their responsibilities. The auctioneers advised me that the sellers solicitor had been advised of the Japanese Knotweed presence on the site, verified by Broxtowe Borough Council Environment Team and had notified potential clients/purchasers.
    Whilst the Auctioneers for professional reasons were not able to give me the name/s of the new owners it will be good when the Council establishes ownership they are clearly advised of their obligations and respond accordingly.

    Along side this concern it is to be hoped public access to this part of the ridge remains open to the general public.

    1. Not sure of city/county boundaries but I think the Japanese knotweed is in the City council area of the land.

      I certainly hope the existing footpaths through the land aren’t closed!

  8. Thanks to all concerned for first highlighting this issue, and then following it up so quickly. Good move by the last Labour/LibDem administration to put protection in place, but we all do indeed need to keep an eye open for any moves to curtail public access (perhaps under the guise of saving us all from the Japanese knotweed) Still hard to know why the auctioneer thought he could advertise the site for development, and why anyone would pay £200,000 for a site that could never be developed. Perhaps the purchaser is going to hand it over to the people of Broxtowe, so they can continue to enjoy it as an open green space!

  9. Having done a little research into ‘Right of Way’ I am lead to believe that if the general public have had access to the land without being asked to stop for over 20 years then the site becomes a ‘Right of Way. I believe access to the ridge has been unrestricted for more that 20 years so I assume the new owners could not stop our use of the area. I would be interested if anyone could clarify if this is correct.

    1. My name is Steve Parkhouse & I am Notts Area Ramblers Right of Way Secretary(applications). I am already helping Lady Bay Residents Association with a similar problem on Trent Fields. I have just been emailed by someone about this case. Debbie is correct about showing use as of right over a period of 20 years, but in this case it must be the 20 years before 1995 because there is a Statutory Declaration, dating back to 1995, that there are no rights of way on the land . However, that means far fewer User Evidence Statements are needed, possibly as few as 20 although the more the better. We have about 260 for the Lady Bay claim. As a first step what is needed is for someone such a community group or local councillor to start organising to find people who used the path or paths before 1995. I can’t do this as I live in the middle of Sherwood Forest, but if a group can be assembled I can act as a consultant. I am not available for the next 6 weeks so don’t expect any quick replies, but I will have internet access in 3 weeks time.

  10. In the early 1980’s I recall that a planning application was made in the region of this land.
    The resident’s association claimed it was “common land” but apparently the local authority had “forgotten” to register it within the appropriate time period
    So we all made a small financial contribution to get a special parliamentary order to make retrospective registration.
    Is this the same area of land?

  11. Not sure your ascertain is right. Steve from the County Council can perhaps clarify.
    My hope like yours is that the new owners will ensure unlimited access as has been the case for many years:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s